November 21, 2014

bbixby's blog

Don't make health care reform end game a dead end for cost control

The end game for health care reform may finally have arrived. Some in Congress are suggesting that a decision should be made by the Easter break, which begins on March 26. Time is running short.

If we learned anything from last week’s health care summit, it is that the final end game negotiations will not take place between Democrats and Republicans but among various factions of Democrats.

Initial Thoughts on the House Health Care Reform Bill

Here are a few initial thoughts from The Concord Coalition about the House of Representatives health care bill (H.R. 3962) and the preliminary scoring of that bill by the Congressional Budget Office (CBO):

Aging, Costs, and Interaction

It has almost become axiomatic that growing health care costs, rather than population aging, is the overwhelming cause of a projected spike in federal spending. That notion was dispelled in CBO’s Long-Term Budget Outlook published last week. As explained in the report:

Listening To Obama's Radio Address

Listening to President Obama’s weekly address on Saturday was a rollercoaster experience for me. At times, I was lifted by his message of fiscal discipline. At other times, I was depressed by his unwillingness to connect fiscal discipline with politically difficult choices.

It started out well with the President’s observation that “the cost of confronting our economic crisis is high. But we cannot settle for a future of rising deficits and debt that our children cannot pay.”

A Welcome Summit

Today’s Washington Post contains a very welcome front-page headline, “Obama Pledges Entitlement Reform.” The article explains that President-elect Obama plans to convene a fiscal responsibility summit in February. According to the Post story:

Congratulations to President-Elect Obama

The Concord Coalition congratulates Barack Obama on his victory in the presidential election. As we detailed in a recent issue brief, the challenges he faces are formidable. Let's hope that after a campaign lasting nearly two years, politicians, the public and the media will now turn to the crucial business of governing. On fiscal policy, it will help to suspend partisan preconceptions and focus instead on practical problem solving.