April 24, 2014

Subscribe to this feed Subscribe to this feed

 

Monday, September 13, 2010 - 3:44 PM

The media is buzzing about how House Minority Leader John Boehner and President Obama might be ready to "compromise" on what to do about the Bush tax cuts.  From a story by Shailagh Murray and Lori Montgomery in Monday's Washington Post:

House Minority Leader John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) surprised Democrats on Sunday when he said he might not oppose President Obama's plan to extend the cuts for all but the wealthiest households, although he reiterated his preference for keeping the lower rates in place for all income groups.

Boehner's comments, made on the CBS program "Face the Nation," altered the landscape of the tax debate by suggesting that Republicans might not obstruct Democratic efforts to raise taxes on the top earners - a move advocated by Obama and many other Democrats as necessary to lowering the record deficit.

But read on in the same story.  Boehner did not say he would support letting the top-end cuts expire.  He said he wouldn't oppose extending all the rest of the tax cuts that President Obama is already proposing to extend:

"If the...

Monday, September 13, 2010 - 2:56 PM

The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services recently updated its estimate of National Health Spending. This unusual mid-year update, delivered in an article in Health Affairs, reflects changes due to the passage of the health care reform law in March, along with a few smaller legislative changes since then.

The overall picture is that within the 2009-2019 time period, projected total national health care spending will slightly increase relative to where it would have been without passage of reform. Annual spending growth will average 0.2 percent higher over the projection period. As a nation, we will go from spending 17.3 percent of GDP on health care in 2009 to 19.3 percent of GDP in 2019, a figure 0.3 percent of GDP higher than it would have been without health care reform.

Within these small overall changes, however, there will be major differences in the number of insured and the payers for health insurance. By 2019, approximately 32.5 million more individuals will have health insurance, which will mean coverage of 92.7 percent of the population (compared to 83 percent prior to passage of the legislation). Within that, Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) enrollment will be one-third...

Sunday, September 5, 2010 - 9:54 PM

The Obama Administration is now considering a new set of tax cuts, primarily aimed at businesses, to further stimulate the economy.  It's reported that a permanent extension of the research and experimentation tax credit is one of these new proposals.  This is just the latest sign that the Administration is stuck in its own "deficit-financed tax cuts box."

My first complaint about these new ideas for tax cuts is that they're not really new at all; they're repeats of essentially permanent tax cuts that are repeatedly renewed.  They are "temporary" in name only. The administration seems to have adopted the mindset that many policymakers in Congress (and not exclusively those from one side of the aisle) have long had -- that the prescription for any kind of economic ailment should be more deficit-financed tax cuts.  But given the fiscal and economic outlook, and how the CBO explains they interact over the longer term (large deficits reducing economic growth), there's no justification for deficit financing permanent tax cuts. That's true even for tax cuts that may be good for longer-term growth (via the supply side of the economy) like the research tax credit.  Deficit-financing is only justified for policies that are designed to effectively and immediately boost...

Monday, August 23, 2010 - 2:17 PM

One of my Concord colleagues recently relayed the following "old joke" to me, remarking that a fiscal policy issue we had been discussing reminded him of it.  But when he said it, it reminded me instead of a different fiscal policy issue (and my favorite): the Bush tax cuts and the impending "fork in the road" for them -- whether they will largely endure as the "Obama tax cuts," or whether they will be allowed to expire as scheduled under current law, at least partially and/or eventually.

"Could you loan me ten dollars but just give me five? That way you'll owe me five, I'll owe you five, and we'll be even."

Conveniently, last week the Congressional Budget Office released their update to their budget and economic outlook, so I have some updated numbers for my Bush/Obama tax cuts version of that joke:

President Obama: "Could you loan me ten dollars $2.65 trillion for 10 years' worth of all of the Bush tax cuts but just give me five...

Thursday, August 19, 2010 - 5:16 PM

Today we updated our "Plausible Baseline" to take into account the Congressional Budget Office (CBO)'s latest Budget and Economic Analysis.

Our press release, "Concord Coalition Says CBO Report Shows Need to Re-examine Fiscal Priorities," is here.

The picture is below, with backup data here.

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, August 10, 2010 - 2:45 PM

Good news comes and goes rather quickly in the 2010 Medicare Trustees’ Report. It begins with the optimistic news that Medicare’s finances have improved substantially as a result of this year’s health care reform bill, the Affordable Care Act (ACA). However, the report then goes on to explain in great detail why this apparently good news is probably not as good as it sounds.

According to the trustees, “actual future Medicare expenditures are likely to exceed the intermediate projections  shown in this report, possibly by quite large amounts.” A separate memo prepared by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Office of the Actuary bluntly states that “the projections in the report do not represent the ‘best estimate’ of actual future Medicare expenditures.”

For those seeking solutions to our nation’s long-term structural deficit, understanding the complex message of the trustees’ report is crucial. Despite the buoyant headlines, the trustees warn, “The financial projections in this report indicate a need for additional steps to address Medicare’s remaining financial challenges.”

On paper, Medicare’s finances have indeed improved. The ACA reduced future non-physician Medicare provider reimbursements and added dedicated...

Monday, August 9, 2010 - 6:13 PM

Social Security’s contribution to the overall fiscal gap over the coming decades is smaller than Medicare’s, as the program’s trustees have again made clear in their annual report. If Social Security contributes so much less to the fiscal gap than Medicare, some people ask, why do we have to talk about reforming Social Security? 

It would be a mistake, however, to ignore the pressure that Social Security will put on the federal budget in the future -- and how that problem, if it is not addressed, will steadily grow. The difference between Social Security’s annual income (without interest) and its annual costs would stay close to 1 percent of GDP for decades but grows closer to 1.5 percent later in the 75-year window under the trustees’ “intermediate” assumptions. The longer we wait, the more difficult fixing the problem will become.

Closing the gap on Social Security certainly won’t be fun and will involve sacrifice. We would not want implement immediate changes that would weaken the economic recovery, nor would we want to place undue burdens on current...

Tuesday, August 3, 2010 - 8:16 AM

If President Obama was looking for Congress to rubber-stamp his request for additional “emergency” funding for military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan this year, he was sorely disappointed. He asked for the money last February but a wary Congress didn’t approve the funding until just last week, and only after considerable debate over the war effort and U.S. spending priorities.

Rep. Jay Inslee, a Democrat from Washington state, offered a striking example of the trade-offs that are involved in heavy spending abroad at a time when communities around the country are struggling financially:  A police department in his district could lose as many as 23 jobs.

“We can’t pay for them – our first line of security in our neighborhood – but today we would be voting for something on the order of several years of about $4 billion to train police officers in Kabul,” Inslee said. Another notable dissent came from House Appropriations Chairman David Obey of Wisconsin, who expressed concern about the high cost of the war and doubts about the Afghan government.

The legislation provides for $59 billion in additional spending this year, with $33.5 billion going to the Department of Defense and the rest...

Monday, August 2, 2010 - 10:58 AM

Below are several developments we have been following since the last edition of the Washington Budget Report (sign up here) was published.

FY 2011 APPROPRIATIONS:  Prior to departing for the August recess, the House passed the first two FY 2011 appropriations bills. The Military Construction-Veterans Affairs bill passed by a vote of 411-6 and the Transportation-HUD bill passed by a vote of 251-167. House subcommittees reported the...

Monday, July 26, 2010 - 4:51 PM

New projections released on Friday afternoon by the Obama administration show that the nation’s finances remain in a deep deficit ditch. This was hardly “news,” but it served as a pointed reminder that much hard work needs to be done to get us back on the road to fiscal sustainability.

In updating the President’s Fiscal Year 2011 budget proposals, the Mid-Session Review (MSR) does not pretend that all will be well once the economy recovers or that getting tough with earmarks and waste will meet the fiscal challenge. The MSR assumes a swift economic recovery and a three-year freeze on non-security appropriations. Yet even with these optimistic assumptions, the budget remains on a path that the administration concedes is unsustainable.

As stated in the MSR Summary, “the economy is still struggling; too many Americans are still out of work; and the Nation’s long-term fiscal trajectory is unsustainable, threatening future prosperity.”

Those looking for good news could point to the fact that the deficit for Fiscal Year 2010, which ends Sept. 30, is now projected to be $1.47 trillion instead of $1.56 trillion. However, a deficit equaling 10 percent of the economy (GDP) as opposed to 10.6 percent is hardly cause for celebration.

...