October 24, 2014

The (Tab)ulation

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Monday, February 1, 2010 - 6:04 PM

Following up on our press release about the President's Fiscal Year 2011 budget proposal, here are a few more thoughts:

Annual discretionary spending:

  • A major element of the Obama administration’s 2015 deficit reduction goal is a three-year freeze on non-security discretionary spending (FY 2011-2013). While the portion of the budget covered by the freeze is less than 20 percent, it would still save an estimated $29 billion in 2015 alone, and $249 billion over 10 years.
  • Clearly, more must be done and even doing this will prove difficult. Nevertheless, The Concord Coalition supports the proposed freeze and, given current economic circumstances, agrees that it is appropriate to begin implementation in 2011. Concord also agrees that the freeze should not be across-the-board. Some programs may merit an increase while others can be cut. An aggregate freeze, as proposed, would help to set priorities and reduce waste.
  • War costs in the budget are likely underestimated. In keeping with last year’s budget, the administration has included annual placeholder sums of $50 billion for war costs beyond 2012. While it is...
Thursday, January 28, 2010 - 10:52 PM

If fiscal responsibility calls for significant changes in the big federal entitlement programs, shouldn’t the defense budget face scrutiny and reductions as well?

That question comes up a lot when The Concord Coalition emphasizes the need for entitlement reform. The answer is, “Yes.”

About a fifth of the federal budget goes to the Pentagon, and it is clear that there are many opportunities to achieve significant savings without jeopardizing national security.

Petty turf wars, bureaucratic bloat, poor planning, lax bookkeeping, no-bid contracts, illogical personnel policies and simple extravagance all inflate the defense budget in ways that knowledgeable taxpayers understandably resent.

In addition, short-sighted members of Congress often champion unnecessary defense spending -- or at least turn a blind eye to it -- in deference to the special interests that stand to profit.

All of this adds to the nation’s fiscal imbalances and massive borrowing. That’s why The Concord Coalition supports careful review of the defense budget to identify reasonable reforms and spending cuts.

In calling for a bipartisan fiscal commission that would submit recommendations to Congress, for example, we have stressed the importance of giving the panel a broad mandate that puts everything on the table. That...

Sunday, January 24, 2010 - 9:06 PM

As the White House and congressional leaders rethink health care reform after the Republican upset in the Massachusetts Senate race, there is a growing danger that Congress will jettison comprehensive health care reform altogether. Even worse, they might pass stripped-down measures that eliminate politically difficult cost-containment, while popular but costly provisions are kept.

President Obama has suggested narrowing the focus of national reform, advising that Congress should “try to move quickly to coalesce around those elements of the package that people agree on.” Some members of Congress have also expressed support for a limited bill.

However, most policy experts agree that a limited bill is nearly impossible to construct without running into some major issues with short and long-term costs. That is because the easier elements -- the ones that “people agree on” -- are interlocked with elements whose benefits are far less apparent to many voters.

The key reforms for the health insurance industry are popular -- for instance, prohibiting discrimination based on pre-existing conditions. Yet, just doing that would lead to an insurance "death spiral" where only the sick would get insurance when needed, driving up the cost of premiums. The only way around this spiral is to have an individual mandate to...

Wednesday, January 20, 2010 - 2:57 AM

"It isn't fiscally irresponsible to raise the debt limit, I think it would be rather irresponsible not to raise the debt limit because we have already incurred the bill."

That quote, from Concord executive director Bob Bixby, is one of many from our new videos highlighting some of the key points driving fiscal discussions in Washington.

We recorded the videos because the Senate is set to begin debate on increasing the debt ceiling while all of Congress awaits the President's budget proposal, which will purportedly contain the Administration's ideas for how to reduce the country's budget deficits. 

The first shows a discussion about the basics behind increasing the debt limit and how there are a few key budget process reforms tied to fiscal responsibility that have become part of the debate as the Senate approaches a difficult vote. We talk about the possible Senate amendments...

Tuesday, January 19, 2010 - 6:52 PM

It’s a little amusing to see how badly the idea of a bipartisan fiscal commission has frightened some partisans at both ends of the political spectrum. That alone indicates the idea may have merit.

Some skeptics, of course, doubt that a special bipartisan panel would have any hope of success in steering the government onto a more responsible fiscal course. And there’s no question that this would be a very tough assignment.

But the strident opposition to a bipartisan commission from some critics on both the right and the left is rooted in fears that such a panel might actually succeed. They describe commission proposals in conspiratorial terms, as though serious bipartisan planning for the nation’s future would be merely a cover for shady plots to sneak reprehensible policies past Congress and the American public. Oh, the deceit of it all...

The Wall Street Journal, for example, recently ran an editorial conceding that “current federal commitments are unsustainable, starting with $37 trillion in unfunded Medicare liabilities.”

Yet the editorial ruled out a bipartisan commission that could tackle this...

Thursday, January 14, 2010 - 12:05 PM

The Concord Coalition is looking to hire a research assistant to help with the Washington Budget Report and other Concord policy work.

For the full position listing and application submission click here.

Tuesday, January 12, 2010 - 11:48 AM

In my previous post, I spent some time clarifying how “advance care planning” is in no way, shape or form the same as a “death panel,” and how palliative care does not equate to any "rationing of care." Rather, both these health care interventions are patient-centered and improve the value of the health care experience for severely, chronically, and terminally ill patients and their families.

As Congress resumes its work and health reform continues to dominate talks on Capitol Hill, I'd like to put these in context given the status of health reform today.

The philosophy behind advance care planning fits nicely with the promotion of an Independent Payment Advisory Board tasked to make recommendations to Congress on slowing future Medicare cost growth. Similarly to advance care planning, where potential treatment options and often difficult decisions are discussed prior to a health crisis, the Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB) is being asked to evaluate the tough choices facing the longevity and fiscal health of the Medicare program in advance of a federal budget crisis. The Advisory Board would be made up of health care experts, people who entered their professions because...

Friday, January 8, 2010 - 4:15 PM

When discussing health care reform, if we cannot even be clear that “advance care planning” is in no way, shape or form the same as a “death panel,” how will we ever be able to talk about the real (and factual) challenges facing the Medicare program and its long-term sustainability?

Ugh….

Let’s be clear: there are no “death panels” included in the health reform bills adopted by the House of Representatives and the Senate, although misinformation on this topic has been swirling for months. For example, last August during the Congressional recess I was quite distraught when my own Senator Charles Grassley stated in an Iowa town hall meeting that he was worried that efforts to increase the efficiency of Medicare or to create an Independent Medicare Advisory Commission would indeed mean that the federal government would be making decisions about when to “pull the plug on Grandma.” More recently, the clause in the House bill that allowed reimbursement to Medicare providers who hold “advanced care planning consultations” with their patients has been equated with a “death panel” deciding when a senior would die.  Nothing could be further from the truth.

Having studied end of life care in graduate school and...

Wednesday, January 6, 2010 - 10:57 AM

When we finished our issue brief on the health care reform "endgame" before the holidays, we had a difficult time trying to isolate the key 10-year costs and savings of different components of the legislation. Now that we have had a bit more time with the final House and Senate versions of the legislation and the CBO analyses, we wanted to present the following table:

 House BillSenate Bill
Insurance Coverage Expansion1052871
   
Minus Offsets  

Spending Cuts

352413
CLASS Act10272
Tax Increases570474
Penalties16843
Subtotal (offsets)1,1921,002
   
Deficit Reduction-138...
Wednesday, December 23, 2009 - 4:07 PM

With the House having passed its version of health care reform (H.R. 3962) and the Senate on the verge of passing its version (H.R. 3590), the outline of a final bill is beginning to take shape. In our new Issue Brief, we look ahead at the fiscal considerations that will likely be the subject of conference committee discussions and “end game” negotiations. These include the cost of expanding coverage, the methods used to prevent that cost from adding to the deficit, and the prospects for systemic reforms to reduce cost growth over time. 

This issue brief gives The Concord Coalition’s perspective on how the bills measure up, what the risks are and how these risks could be lessened. We conclude that:

•    Both bills establish...