September 1, 2014

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Saturday, August 11, 2012 - 4:30 PM

Here are links to some previously published material by The Concord Coalition on proposals by House Budget Chairman Paul Ryan, who was named Saturday as Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney's running mate.

Politico Op-Ed by Robert L. Bixby (April 17, 2012)

Concord Coalition Analysis of Ryan Budget Plan (March 20, 2012)

Blog Post by Robert L. Bixby on Wyden-Ryan Medicare Plan (Dec. 20, 2011)

Blog Post by Robert L. Bixby on Medicare Proposals (May 31, 2011)

Blog Post by Robert L. Bixby Comparing Obama and Ryan Budget Proposals (April 12, 2011)

 

 

Saturday, August 11, 2012 - 3:46 PM

 

This commentary originally appeared on The Concord Square May 31, 2011

As a matter of controlling Medicare costs, I find myself liking a bit of Rep. Paul Ryan’s approach and a bit of President Obama’s. Too bad the political climate is such that Democrats and Republicans don’t seem willing to acknowledge that the other might just have a good idea.

In Ryan’s favor, I think the premium support model holds out the best hope for reining in cost growth. It would allow us to set a Medicare “budget” and create incentives for a more efficient system. Without a budget, I worry that efficiencies found in the pilot programs and demonstration projects enacted last year will not be translated into real savings. Of course for premium support to work, the level of support and growth rate have to be realistic. In this regard, I’m with those who think that Ryan’s plan misses the mark. However, the concept should not be rejected just because the details are flawed.

Even if we move toward premium support, we should have a back-up mechanism to ensure that targets are met and that quality of care is improving. President Obama’s suggestion to strengthen the Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB) would fill this role. It’s pretty clear that politicians are not the best at cutting health care costs. If...

Friday, August 10, 2012 - 2:05 PM

Congressional procrastination could lead to chaotic decision-making on the federal budget after the November elections, but many economists believe this procrastination is already harming the economy.

The damage stems from widespread uncertainty over what elected officials will do, if anything, about the “fiscal cliff” – a combination of sharp “automatic” spending cuts and the scheduled expiration of tax cuts at year’s end.

The Wall Street Journal reported today on its survey of 47 economists, noting their widespread concern about the growing economic cost of congressional inaction. This “adds insult to injury to an economy already flirting with a stall rate,” said Diane Swonk of Mesirow Financial. Another analyst, Julia Coronado of BNP Paribas, said: “We are already feeling the effects in hiring and investment.”

The general expectation in Washington is that elected officials will not take action on the fiscal cliff until after the elections, despite encouragement throughout much of this year from The Concord Coalition and many other analysts and groups to work out a bipartisan action plan as soon as possible.

...
Thursday, August 9, 2012 - 9:10 AM

Beginning in January, approximately $109 billion in across-the-board spending cuts are scheduled to automatically take effect. Known in budget policy circles as a “sequester,” these cuts are unusual in that the executive branch directs how the spending cuts occur, as opposed to the traditional locus for such cuts -- the congressional Appropriations Committees.

Because this sequester could have such a dramatic impact on many federal programs and the economy in general, Congress is eagerly awaiting specifics about how the administration plans to implement the cuts. On Tuesday President Obama signed the Sequestration Transparency Act, which requires him and the Office of Management and Budget to put forth a report in 30 days on how a sequester would be implemented. An overwhelming House majority passed the legislation last month, and the Senate approved it unanimously.

Sequesters have been part of the budget process for decades. Were this sequester to go into effect, however, it would be among the few that have ever actually taken place in this country’s history, and would certainly have the greatest budgetary effect.

The sequester was initially intended as a “Sword of Damocles” over the “super committee” created by the August 2011 deal to raise the debt limit. It was not actually designed to take effect;...

Monday, August 6, 2012 - 2:00 PM

Updated 8/17 with "History of Debt" infographic below

The Concord Coalition is proud to be partnering with a new effort called "Face the Facts USA." This nonpartisan initiative is a project of the George Washington University School of Media and Public Affairs and will be providing a new fact every day until the election (for 100 total).

The exciting part of the project is that along with their facts, they are producing great infographics and video content that make it easier to understand significant issues and trends that are (or should be) part of the national discussion as we approach election day.

They have also solicited involvement from some important organizations in the policy community to shed further light on the information in their facts -- and that is where The Concord Concord fits in. Many of the facts the project will be presenting falls into categories that Concord writes about and discusses, which allows us to add supplemental material to go along with the fact of the day.

Already, there have been two debt related facts. On...

Wednesday, August 1, 2012 - 6:04 PM

Rep. Steven LaTourette’s announcement this week that he will not seek re-election underscores the difficulties that face elected officials who try to take a constructive, bipartisan approach to dealing with the nation’s most important challenges – notably the need for fundamental fiscal reforms.

“For a long time now, words like compromise have been considered to be dirty words,” the Republican said in a press conference in his Ohio district Tuesday. “And there are people on the right and the left who think that if you compromise you’re a coward . . . . you’re an appeaser.”

LaTourette, who has served in the House since 1995, has built a reputation as a moderate who seeks bipartisan compromise and is willing to challenge members of his own party when he feels they are taking less constructive positions. His frustration, echoed by many other moderates in Washington, should serve as a warning to American voters that partisanship and political intransigence are clouding the country’s future.

That’s particularly true in fiscal policy, as LaTourette indicated in his press conference. He understands the need for sweeping changes to put the federal budget on a more responsible and sustainable course, as recommended by an array of bipartisan groups, including...

Friday, July 27, 2012 - 10:19 AM

The severe fiscal, financial and economic difficulties in Europe underscore the need for Washington to develop credible plans for comprehensive, long-term fiscal reforms -- in part because spillover problems from Europe could well aggravate U.S. budget challenges.

But Europe’s experience also cautions against excessive austerity measures that can turn a weak recovery into another recession. “These are critical times,” says Senate Budget Committee Chairman Kent Conrad, “and we’ve got to be smart about how we get back on track.”

These were among the key themes that emerged Thursday at a forum in Washington that focused on Europe’s perilous situation and its possible implications for the American economy and U.S. fiscal policy. The program was sponsored by the Committee for Economic Development (CED) and The Concord Coalition.

In addition to Conrad’s keynote speech, the forum featured Stephanie Riso, the head of the European Union's fiscal policy unit, and a panel of four American economists: Douglas Elliott, a fellow with the Brookings Institution; Simon Johnson, an MIT professor; Joseph Minarik, senior vice president and director of research with CED, and Diane Lim Rogers, Concord’s chief economist. Ed Andrews, a former New York Times economics correspondent, served as...

Tuesday, July 24, 2012 - 4:14 PM

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) today estimated that repealing the 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA) would increase federal budget deficits between next year and 2022 by around $109 billion, only a small change from previous estimates. The CBO suggests that this can also be considered a rough estimate for how much the ACA reduces the deficit over the same time period.

The CBO cautions, however, that its estimates are uncertain because the projected effects of the law are themselves “highly uncertain.” The law contains some provisions that are projected to cost the government money, but others that would save money or provide additional revenue.

Also updated were CBO’s estimates of the budgetary effects of just the ACA’s health insurance coverage provisions in light of last month’s Supreme Court decision, which allows states to choose whether or not to expand eligibility for coverage under their Medicaid programs.

The budget office now estimates that these coverage provisions would have a net cost of $1,168 billion from 2012 to 2022, a net reduction of about $84 billion from estimates last March. This slightly reduced spending would come about because even with some states opting out of the relatively cheap Medicaid expansion and pushing some...

Tuesday, July 17, 2012 - 12:52 PM

Today Concord Coalition Co-Chair Sam Nunn, a former U.S. senator from Georgia, helped launch the Campaign to Fix the Debt.  This project is a non-partisan initiative to put America on a better fiscal and economic path.  Nunn is a member of the campaign's steering committee.  

In advance of the campaign's launch, Nunn said:

"On fiscal matters, neither political party can impose its will on the other, and that it is not likely to change after the election.  Successfully tackling our fiscal challenges requires Members of Congress to come together across party lines with a balanced plan that will strengthen the economy, reassure markets, and save future generations from an unbearable debt burden.  There are good people across the political spectrum who recognize this in putting together the Simpson  – Bowles and the Domenici  – Rivlin plans.  There are many Members of Congress who are willing to work together, but they get hit hard from both sides and need a foundation of citizen support.  The Campaign to Fix the Debt hopes to give these folks in Washington, DC and across the country the support they need to work together to put our nation's interest above political parties and to strengthen America to protect our children's...

Monday, July 2, 2012 - 10:59 AM

This post was co-authored with Louise Mackey, intern from the Washington Ireland Program 

Interest rates are at historically low levels, making borrowing very affordable for consumers -- and the United States government. When it issues debt, the federal government, like any other borrower, pays interest. This is how the government finances its annual budget deficits.

Why are interest rates so low now?

There are two primary reasons. First, during the recession there was less demand for credit. And to combat this, the Federal Reserve brought interest rates down to spur borrowing. Second, in response to the global economic slowdown, investors around the world have been desperate to place their money in a safe haven -- and U.S. Treasuries are still considered the safest investment in the world.

Interest rates are projected to stay at or near historic lows over the next two years as the economy continues to recover. Eventually, though, interest rates will begin to return to normal levels as economic growth puts inflationary pressure on the economy. This normalization of rates will increase the government’s borrowing costs. Those costs will also be going up simply because the government is borrowing...